Monday, July 29, 2013

Increased antibiotic resistance cause for concern: Researchers

http://bangalore.citizenmatters.in/articles/increased-antibiotic-resistance-cause-for-concern-researchers

The World Health Organisation recently announced a ‘global health crisis’ of increased antibiotic resistance. The studies done by WHO have marked India as one of the countries to be suffering from the consequence.

Three medical researchers working as an Associate Professors at R D Gardi Medical College, Ujjain, Dr. Ashish Pathak, Vishal Diwan and Dr. Megha Sharma, conducted a study in Ujjain to get to know the real cause of the problem and to find out solutions for the same. 

Infectious diseases experts raise alarm at growing superbug risk – Louise Milligan | ABC News

 – Louise Milligan | ABC News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-07-24/infectious-diseases-experts-raise-alarm-at-growing-superbug-risk/4841740

Medical experts have raised fears of a new strain of antibiotic-resistant superbug spread through food and even drinking water, and the British chief medical officer has described the superbug threat as ranking with terrorism or global warming. Australia’s chief scientist this month warned antibiotic resistance could mean an end to modern medicine as we know it.

Antibiotic resistance – The last resort - Maryn McKenna | Nature





http://www.nature.com/news/antibiotic-resistance-the-last-resort-1.13426


Thomas Frieden and Sally Davies have recently been speaking publicly about the soaring increase in a little-known class of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CREs). Davies, the United Kingdom’s chief medical officer, described CREs as a risk as serious as terrorism (see Nature 495, 141; 2013). “We have a very serious problem, and we need to sound an alarm,” said Frieden, director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia.
Their dire phrasing was warranted. CREs cause bladder, lung and blood infections that can spiral into life-threatening septic shock. They evade the action of almost all antibiotics — including the carbapenems, which are considered drugs of last resort — and they kill up to half of all patients who contract them. In the United States, these bacteria have been found in 4% of all hospitals and 18% of those that offer long-term critical care.

Monday, July 15, 2013

Read The ``TRUE LIFE STORY``of a family infected with MRSA